Devon’s Rich Historic Landmarks

The county of Devon boasts a history and heritage just as rich as its landscapes and wildlife. As a legacy of its history Devon has been left with some wonderful landmarks that are just waiting to be explored during a holiday in Devon.

The oldest of Devon’s landmarks dates back an amazing 400 millions years. Kents Caverns is one of the most important cave systems in the whole of the UK and has been home to eight different native populations that have lived in England over thousands and thousands of years. The caves are protected as they are the most important prehistoric cave dwellings in the country and are known across the world for their record of prehistoric people living in Europe. A tour of the caves offers a fascinating insight in to how ancient humans lived as well as the chance to see rock formations that have been hundreds of millions of years in the making.

Exeter Cathedral is one of the most beautiful cathedrals found in the South West. The cathedral lies in the heart of the city of Exeter and is dedicated to St. Peter. The cathedral was founded in 1050 and the building we see today was completed in the early 1400’s. It is home to the longest uninterrupted vaulted ceiling in England, other features include the Astronomical Clock, the 14th century Minstrels gallery, the bishop’s throne and the great east window.

DartmouthCastlehas to be one of the prettiest fortresses in the country. For over 600 years, the castle has sat on a picturesque spot at the entrance to the Dart Estuary and the port of Dartmouth. The castle saw action in the Civil War and continued to be used for military use right up till the Second World War. The well persevered fort has plenty of passages, rooms and fortifications to explore, displays throughout the castle halls bring 600 years of history to life. Climb to the top of the gun tower, the first tower built in Britain to hold heavy ship sinking guns, and see how the estuary could be blocked to enemy ships using a heavy chain, it will also offer some gorgeous views of the estuary.

Sacred Land of the Heart – Spirituality of the Soul’s History

I can only imagine the tremendous value of the land so far as both the people of antiquity and the Indigenous are concerned. I have to concur. The Land, for me also, has tremendous power and significance about it. Land is sacred to the heart. Our histories are indelibly attached to it.

I took the opportunity recently to re-trace some of my personal heritage. I have found that cherishing the land is a big part of cherishing my heritage–it’s about cherishing the very parts that have ‘become me.’
Re-tracing my heritage “trails” involved both old land and new land; reflecting over times significant in the past as well as foreseeing the significance of events–or certainly landmarks–of the future.

Watching the land is amazing. How it changes. A place I went back to was the land of my grandmother’s–I stayed with her for a few months, now over twenty years ago. She has since passed away long ago and the block of units we lived in has long been swept away. The whole area looks vastly different. I also visited my favourite university cafĂ© and found the menu had changed–no more cheap and ‘to die for’ food there! And whilst these things had changed, the land had not. I’m thankful to God for that fact!

What of the New Land?

A time of change is not just sad, it’s a happy time too as we gain anticipation of what the new time–a new season–might bring. New routines, new surroundings–a totally fresh environment. Watching the land gives way also to respecting the land. It’s vital that we respect it; not simply physically–but spiritually too. To cherish the land’s role in our lives, and let the memories live on; this is what I mean.

The land is inherently part of our heart. It is sacred just as our hearts are. The testimony of our memories gives the land this treasured legacy as both the means to and manifestation of our heart. The Land is the context of life. It is God’s landscape for meaning.

Rajasthan Tours – Fairs & Festivals of North India

Travel to Rajasthan and be awed by the splendid beauty of its landscape and culture. Some of the most recommended Rajasthan travel destinations are Jaipur, Jodhpur, Udaipur, Jaisalmer, Pushkar, Bikaner and Bharatpur. It is always proclaimed that Rajasthan is a traveler’s seventh heaven especially for those travelers who love and appreciate legacy. Rajasthan doesn’t only offer sightseeing of forts and palaces but also colorful and vibrant fairs and festivals in which an outsider is always welcomed with honor. From its people with their vibrant clothes to the gorgeous sand dunes of the Great Thar Desert, Rajasthan is a place with sights that may seem ethereal and fresh to one’s eyes. This destination reveals and unravels its history and heritage through its various art-forms like music, dances, story-telling and even puppetry. You can shop for beautiful ethnic arts and crafts in various Rajasthani towns. To stay in Rajasthan is as much a pleasure as traveling around the colorful locations.

The majestic heritage structures serve as palace hotels today as they make all the difference between ordinary events to an extraordinary experience. During the discovery of Rajasthan, the tourists can explore the land of the shimmering sand by enjoying a ride on a camel’s back in the Thar Desert. Rajasthan is a vibrant state with signs of royalty everywhere. For instance at the Pushkar valley that is one of the most fascinating Hindu pilgrimages a huge number of tourists from all over the world come to witness the elaborate occasion of the holy bath in the Pushkar Lake. This is just one of the many such events that one can enjoy with the Rajasthani locals as part of different colorful festivals of the state. Rajasthan is also often called a shopper’s paradise with beautiful goods found at low prices. Famous for textiles, semi-precious stones and eye-catching handicrafts items like wooden furniture and handicrafts, carpets, blue pottery are very inviting to shoppers. Known for its traditional, colourful art, tie and dye prints, the block prints, Bagaru prints, Sanganer prints, Zari embroidery are promising export products from Rajasthan.

Endowed with natural beautiful habitats and a splendid history, tourism is a growing industry in Rajasthan that is welcomed by locals gracefully. The palaces of Jaipur, lakes of Udaipur, and forts amidst deserts of Jodhpur, Bikaner and Jaisalmer are sites amongst the preferred destinations. All these important tourist cities are connected by road, rail and air.

Rajasthan, though a desert land by topography is one of the most colorful regions across the world because of its vibrant fairs and festivals. Here is a list of the popular festivals of Rajasthan.

Festivals of Rajasthan:

Camel Festival – Every year starts with the Camel festival at Bikaner. The entire town turns colorful with bright colors and vibrant with lively music. One will be fortunate to see camels decorated in the most striking colors race each other, camel dances and various other events.

Desert Festival – This popular festival of Jaisalmer happens during the full moon in February. The desert livens up with a range of Rajasthani dances like Gangaur, Ghoomer and many others. The highlights are the turban tying competition and the Mr. Desert contest after which the festival concludes with a sound and light show.

Elephant Festival – The Elephant Festival takes place at Jaipur. These mighty animals take the center stage and gait majestically parading their colorfully decorated trunks and tusks followed by folk dancers. This is the occasion when Ganpathi, the elephant god is worshipped.

Gangaur spring festival – Rajasthan’s popular festival, the spring festival of Gangaur is celebrated in March/April. This festival of women is celebrated for 18 days for good fortune for their husbands. A grand procession is taken out of the Jaipur City Palace and Goddess Gauri is carried in a colorful chariot led by decorated animals.

Mewar Festival – The Mewar Festival of Udaipur welcomes spring, with a beautiful display of Rajasthani culture through songs, dances, processions and displays.

Urs Ajmer Sharif – In memory of Khwaja Moinuddin Christi, this festival is held as per the lunar calendar. As he was the helper of the unprivileged this festival is celebrated at Ajmer as one of the biggest Muslim festivals in India.

Marwar Festival – Originally known as the Maand Festival is a centered around the dreamy lifestyle of Rajasthani rulers, the festival recreates the royal charm and graceful dances of the desert. It is held during the full moon in October for two days.

Pushkar Fair – Celebrated at Pushkar (Snake Mountain) which is on the edge of the desert. The town clings to the small but beautiful Pushkar Lake. During the fair, Rajasthani tribals, Indian pilgrims and even filmmakers from around the world unite here.

Witnessing these few of the many festivals in Rajasthan, this place of color and vibrancy one needs no reason to celebrate.